Has anyone tried to run andLinux on ReactOS?

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adr3211
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Has anyone tried to run andLinux on ReactOS?

Post by adr3211 » Wed Sep 20, 2017 10:24 am

The basis for some of these advanced electronics is already in place. BMW's 7-Series limousine is available overseas with internet connectivity, while many cars a especially more expensive variants a now have a colour display screen. BMW will start offering internet connectivity in Australia by the end of this year, with the car's iDrive display screen acting as the computer monitor and the iDrive joystick operating as a mouse. Meanwhile, Mercedes-Benz has developed a wireless hot-spot in its vehicles. The InCar Hotspot uses an antenna to access the internet and allows up to three devices to use the mobile connection. It would allow devices such as iPhones and laptop computers to be constantly connected to the internet while driving, allowing passengers to browse the internet, watch videos or even blog while on the run. What is the Difference between Coaxial and Component speakers
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The in-car internet access will be available initially in Europe on the E-Class and S-Class sedans but is likely to find its way Down Under eventually. For Nissan's GT-R sports car, the central screen houses a formula one-style telemetry display that can be customised like a computer game by the driver. Ford has worked with software giant Microsoft to kick off its electronics revolution. The system, called Ford Sync, uses a USB port and Bluetooth to connect mobile phones and portable music players to the car. The voice activation technology means drivers can access menus and functions without taking their eyes off the road.

The system transfers address books from the phone to the car and can also deliver audible text messages to the cabin. Ford also has an optional smart satellite-navigation system called Travel Link, which can offer a wide range of real-time services, including weather conditions, service-station locations, fuel prices and even cinema schedules. Ford is expected to begin offering the Microsoft-developed Sync and associated Travel Link systems in Australia as early as next year. The company claims cars fitted with the Sync system are selling quicker and at higher transaction prices. Ford and Microsoft say the software connection program has even been "future-proofed" to allow for updates and future technology.

Working with technology providers is a trend set to gain pace in the automotive sphere, in much the same way as car companies work with audio-system suppliers, such as Bose and Harman Kardon. BlackBerry recently signalled its intention to cash in on the trend by buying a key software supplier to some of the world's leading car companies, including Volkswagen, BMW and Hyundai. By hooking up with consumer-electronics specialists, brands are slowly overcoming one of their biggest customer satisfaction handicaps a the slow pace of vehicle development. New-vehicle programs typically take up to three years to come to fruition, a lead time that can be an eternity in consumer electronics. Some have taken to incorporating plug-in audio systems that don't look as good as rivals but can be upgraded when new technology arrives. Electric-car maker Tesla is looking to banish traditional buttons and knobs from its upcoming Model S, which will have a 17-inch touchscreen in lieu of traditional airconditioning and stereo controls.

The touchscreen will control all the comfort, communication and entertainment functions, as well as delivering wireless connectivity for accessing the internet. Audi's A1 concept vehicle has a "removable Audi mobile device", a portable, plug-in unit that acts as a smart key, mobile phone, audio and video player, as well as an interface for the navigation system. It can also pre-heat or pre-cool the car's interior remotely. Holden's parent company, General Motors, recently announced a new smartphone app that could replace a car's key. The app, available for the iPhone and Google Phone on some cars in the US, allows drivers to activate the traditional key fob features, including unlocking the doors and opening the boot. There will also be a remote-start function for warming or cooling the car and a "car-finder" that activates your car's horn and lights at the touch of a button, allowing you to find it in a busy car park.

The app will also display a car "health report" and keep tabs on fuel range, oil life, tyre pressures and average fuel economy. Even the humble Holden Commodore is taking a step towards electronic interactivity. When it enters showrooms next month, the VE Series II will include a hard-drive multimedia system that can "rip" as many as 15 music CDs for playback. More expensive models will get the smart satellite-navigation system to beat traffic jams. But the interface between car and driver doesn't have to rely on a simple screen. In the case of Audi's A8 flagship, it includes handwriting recognition for inputting data. Mazda designers are already envisaging a Star Wars-like three-dimensional pod that could display everything from the ventilation and sound system to the internet connectivity. A Guide to the Simple Way Difference in Car Speakers: 2 way, 3 way, 4 way

It could even display 3D silhouettes of friends or contacts to personalise an in-car phone call. "The HMI [human machine interface] is the heart of the car, from inside to outside," says Mazda Europe design chief Peter Birtwhistle, when explaining the Shinari's vision. And it's all about customisation. Being able to customise a car will also be crucial as 21st-century motoring evolves. As with other companies, Mazda is predicting car sharing will increase during the next decade, partly because of financial constraints and congested roads but also because of environmental concerns and changes to social structures, including higher divorce rates. "People will be sharing more in 2020," Birtwhistle says. Volvo design head Peter Horbury told Drive recently that the brand was exploring the electronics revolution, often relying on young designers to brainstorm ideas he says offer limitless possibilities.
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Part of that involved looking at ways to integrate an iPad into the dash of a vehicle, potentially taking advantage of the many apps that help make iPhones and iPads so popular a and customisable. Apple spokeswoman Fiona Martin says some companies are already working on integrating Apple technology into their cars, potentially using the iPad as the car's internet interface, something that creates a potential danger when the technology is updated. "Some of the car manufacturers are already doing things that are actually implemented into the audio systems themselves," she says. Ferrari already offers an in-dash iPod on some models, allowing owners to store their music library on-board and unplug it when they park the car.

Some are wary of going too far with in-car electronic applications, worried that if an iPod or iPad takes control of the car's radio and airconditioning controls, the car's maker is then not in control of quality and reliability issues. Apple is also notoriously closed when it comes to dealing with third parties, potentially leaving car companies with outdated technology midway through the cycle of a product. The devices also have the potential to trim already slender company profit margins; instead of selling a $3000 satellite-navigation system as an option, brands face the prospect of only providing an iPod bracket or connection plug worth a couple of hundred dollars. Mazda says it would prefer to provide the display built into the car and offer the customisable functions as the main display, instead of helping develop a screen that integrates into the car's interior. "What's key for Mazda is how we present it," Jenkins says. Read more about How to choose the best car spekaers

One thing's for sure: just as Apple could never have envisaged the breadth of apps developed for its iPhone, the surface has only just been scratched for automotive electronic applications. Designers who brought the Shinari concept car to life admit the possibilities are endless. Just as a decade ago it was impossible to imagine a fridge that could automatically compile your weekly grocery list or a video recorder you could program from the other side of the world, car companies are out to answer the questions few have asked but many would like answered. a For more on the future of motoring, go to drive.com.au/technology
Last edited by adr3211 on Tue Dec 05, 2017 10:42 am, edited 1 time in total.

dizt3mp3r
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Re: Has anyone tried to run andLinux on ReactOS?

Post by dizt3mp3r » Wed Sep 20, 2017 11:23 am

Do a bit of research yourself and you'll find out ReactOS is alpha-stage and not really suitable at the moment as a host or co-host for other o/ses. It might be able to do it though I suspect it will run into problems.

By all means test and report back here, perhaps raise a bug or two. I have no doubt that eventually it will run on ReactOS just as it runs on Windows, that's the whole point of ReactOS - but at the moment - for you to find out - it is really down to you to test unless of course you are lucky and someone else here has some limited testing experience.

Remember, people here are not really day to day users of ReactOs, they are generally developers or testers. That's what we mean by Alpha-stage.

oldman
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Re: Has anyone tried to run andLinux on ReactOS?

Post by oldman » Wed Sep 20, 2017 1:28 pm

adr3211 wrote:I'm just learning about ReactOS; I've heard the name but I haven't done much research into it. If anyone knows how well andLinux would run on ReactOS, feel free to give info regarding how well they run, and any other info on ReactOS that might be helpful, (i'm a newbie to non-linux alt OS's)
To run Linux in ReactOS, you will need to run it in a VM; the last time I tried VirtualBox it could not be configured, so that is out.

You can run ReactOS in Linux using a VM! I have successfully run VirtualBox in Linux with ReactOS installed in the VM and I have been able to collect debug output from ReactOS via tty0tty and Putty; which is useful when testing. Qemu will run ReactOS, but I have not yet been able to use tty0tty virtual ports with it.
Please keep the Windows classic (9x/2000) look and feel.
The layman's guides to - debugging - bug reporting - compiling - with some complementary scripts.
They may help you with a problem, so do have a look at them.

dizt3mp3r
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Re: Has anyone tried to run andLinux on ReactOS?

Post by dizt3mp3r » Wed Sep 20, 2017 5:44 pm

Oldman, andlinux is a co-hosted linux system - a subsystem I suppose. It has a typographically confusing name.

oldman
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Re: Has anyone tried to run andLinux on ReactOS?

Post by oldman » Wed Sep 20, 2017 6:49 pm

dizt3mp3r wrote:Oldman, andlinux is a co-hosted linux system - a subsystem I suppose. It has a typographically confusing name.
I had not heard of andlinux until you posted this. I thought it was strange asking if Linux ran in ReactOS.

I suppose they derive there name from WindowsandLinux.

For anyone interested in testing this in ReactOS, here is the url for andLinux
Please keep the Windows classic (9x/2000) look and feel.
The layman's guides to - debugging - bug reporting - compiling - with some complementary scripts.
They may help you with a problem, so do have a look at them.

middings
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Re: Has anyone tried to run andLinux on ReactOS?

Post by middings » Fri Sep 22, 2017 9:57 am

adr3211 wrote:... If anyone knows how well andLinux would run on ReactOS...
Mentioning a piece of obscure software in an online forum but failing to supply a link to the software provider's web page is impolite and poor netiquette.
andLinux

verserk
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Re: Has anyone tried to run andLinux on ReactOS?

Post by verserk » Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:48 pm

I installed the latest minimal version of andlinux and the installer succeeds with errors (mentioned something about a network adaptor and the largest .vdi file was too large though I had ReactOS on a 100GiB virtual disk). The FTLK console opens fine though. Try installing it on your host OS and transferring the .vdi to the virtual machine to test.
ReactOS: HP pavilion dv6500.

MadWolf
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Re: Has anyone tried to run andLinux on ReactOS?

Post by MadWolf » Thu Nov 09, 2017 10:54 pm

verserk wrote: largest .vdi file was too large though I had ReactOS on a 100GiB virtual disk).
that's a limitation of fat32 that has a maximum files size of just under 4GB

ROCKNROLLKID
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Re: Has anyone tried to run andLinux on ReactOS?

Post by ROCKNROLLKID » Fri Nov 10, 2017 4:00 am

MadWolf wrote:
verserk wrote: largest .vdi file was too large though I had ReactOS on a 100GiB virtual disk).
that's a limitation of fat32 that has a maximum files size of just under 4GB
While what you say is true, it is also a limit of the address space in 32-bit, so even if we used winbtrfs or ntfs, this issue would still be happening. 32-bit address space is maximum of 4gb. Unfortunately, the only solution would be a 64-bit build for ReactOS.

EmuandCo
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Re: Has anyone tried to run andLinux on ReactOS?

Post by EmuandCo » Fri Nov 10, 2017 10:25 am

Not entirely correct. You can copy and edit >>4 GB files on a 32 bit Windows, too. There are enough tricks to get this done on 32 bit, too.
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ReactOS is still in alpha stage, meaning it is not feature-complete and is recommended only for evaluation and testing purposes.

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